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Augarten Porcelain

These distinctive handmade beakers draw inspiration from Austria's diverse and outstanding landscape.

Author: Ursula Schiller



Mighty mountains, crystal-clear lakes and high-quality drinking water are all elements of Austria’s idyllic and unspoiled natural heritage and provided the inspiration for the Vienna-based artist Hanna Burkart. As part of an arts project initiated by the Austrian Tourist Board, she drew on all these aspects to create the Mountain_Water beaker, a strongly expressive work of art. She was fascinated by the rugged structure of the mountains, and used them as inspiration to shape the design of her beaker.

The beaker offers up new perspectives on nature in Austria. It encapsulates blooming mountain pastures, glass-clear lakes and almighty mountains. Slow down and live mindfully, find a quiet moment for yourself away from the stressful daily grind - simply absorb yourself in nature and enjoy the moment. Take the drinking beaker in your hand and switch off - all that constitutes a bit of 'me time'.

Made by hand

  • Porzellanmanufaktur Augarten © Österreich Werbung / Rainer Fehringer Porzellanmanufaktur Augarten © Österreich Werbung / Rainer Fehringer


 

Tradition and modernity

Producing them presented something of a challenge that called for the most skilled professionals in the field. With almost 300 years of experience, the Augarten Porcelain Manufactory, a Viennese company with a tradition dating back to 1718, proved the perfect partner.

Europe’s second-oldest porcelain manufacturers usually create white tableware from translucent porcelain and with delicate hand-painted patterns. Equally famous are its porcelain figurines, such as those of the famous white horses of the Spanish Riding School.

The artisans at the manufacturers were initially surprised by the Mountain_Water beaker, as the design was vastly different from what they were used to. They were not to be fazed, as the Viennese Porcelain Manufactory Augarten has been working with contemporary artists and designers for many years and has kept abreast of the latest trends. As a result, none of those involved in the project had the slightest doubt that their collaboration would lead to anything but success.
 

The manufacturing process

  • Porzellanmanufaktur Augarten © Österreich Werbung / Rainer Fehringer Porzellanmanufaktur Augarten © Österreich Werbung / Rainer Fehringer
  • Porzellanmanufaktur Augarten © Österreich Werbung / Rainer Fehringer Porzellanmanufaktur Augarten © Österreich Werbung / Rainer Fehringer
  • Porzellanmanufaktur Augarten © Österreich Werbung / Rainer Fehringer Porzellanmanufaktur Augarten © Österreich Werbung / Rainer Fehringer
  • Porzellanmanufaktur Augarten © Österreich Werbung / Rainer Fehringer Porzellanmanufaktur Augarten © Österreich Werbung / Rainer Fehringer
  • Porzellanmanufaktur Augarten © Österreich Werbung / Rainer Fehringer Porzellanmanufaktur Augarten © Österreich Werbung / Rainer Fehringer
  • Porzellanmanufaktur Augarten © Österreich Werbung / Rainer Fehringer Porzellanmanufaktur Augarten © Österreich Werbung / Rainer Fehringer
  • Porzellanmanufaktur Augarten © Österreich Werbung / Rainer Fehringer Porzellanmanufaktur Augarten © Österreich Werbung / Rainer Fehringer
  • Porzellanmanufaktur Augarten © Österreich Werbung / Rainer Fehringer Porzellanmanufaktur Augarten © Österreich Werbung / Rainer Fehringer
  • Porzellanmanufaktur Augarten © Österreich Werbung / Rainer Fehringer Porzellanmanufaktur Augarten © Österreich Werbung / Rainer Fehringer
  • Porzellanmanufaktur Augarten © Österreich Werbung / Rainer Fehringer Porzellanmanufaktur Augarten © Österreich Werbung / Rainer Fehringer
From the mould to the beaker
The beakers are manufactured in several stages. The first, and most time consuming, is the making of the moulds. A master mould has to be designed, from which the plaster case moulds are made. Each beaker must then be biscuit fired at a temperature of 980 °C for 18 to 20 hours. After glazing they are fired for a second time at a temperature of roughly 1,400 °C for between eight and 16 hours. The process of glazing and firing is then repeated once more to give the beakers their smooth, glazed surface. These particular beakers are only glazed on the inside to give the outer structure its rough and stony appearance.

If you’re wondering what a handmade beaker like this is made of, the answer is: kaolin, feldspar and quartz – all pure natural materials.
 

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