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    St. Pölten

    St. Pölten, the youngest of Austria's regional capitals, combines Baroque and modern architecture like no other Austrian city.

    Located just half an hour west of Vienna, St. Pölten is well worth a visit on its own. The capital of Lower Austria features both an enchanting Old Town and striking contemporary architecture. What's more, it makes a great base to explore all the sights the province has to offer.

    Must-Sees in St. Pölten

    Stroll through several delightful old town squares - the Herrenplatz, the Rathausplatz and Riemerplatz - adorned with beautiful Baroque and Jugendstil facades. Visit the oldest business of the city, the "Löwen Apotheke" (the lions pharmacy), the Rathaus (town hall), the former Synagogue and the Franciscan Church. The very modern government district is easily recognisable by its remarkable architecture and features highlights such as the Festspielhaus, the Museum Niederösterreich, the Landtagsschiff and the Klangturm.

    About St. Pölten

    The capital of Lower Austria is the oldest documented town in Austria. The city charter, which was granted in 1159, even marks it as one of the oldest ones in Europe. The historic centre mainly goes back to the city's golden era in the 17th and 18th century, when its Baroque splendour rivalled that of Vienna.

    Top Highlights in St. Pölten

    •                         St. Pölten city hall square
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      Rathaus (City Hall)

      St. Pölten's Rathaus was first mentioned in a document in 1503. It combines various architectural styles, from Baroque to Renaissance and Gothic.
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    •                         Interior view of the Cathedral Church of St. Pölten
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      Cathedral St. Pölten

      Right on Domplatz, the Cathedral of St. Pölten was originally built in Romanesque style. The Baroque design was later added by Jakob Prandtauer.
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    •                         Former synagogue in St. Pölten
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      Former Synagogue

      This is the only Art-Nouveau synagogue in Lower Austria, featuring rich paintings in ornamental forms of the Wiener Werkstätte.
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    •                         Festspielhaus St. Pölten (Festival Theatre)
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      Festspielhaus

      The Festspielhaus St. Pölten is one of the most striking theatre buildings of contemporary architecture in Austria, and the permanent residence of the famous Tonkünstler Orchestra.
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    •                         Landtagsschiff in St. Pölten, seat of the Lower Austrian government / St. Pölten
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      Landtagsschiff

      The Landtagsschiff, built by DI Ernst Hoffmann, is another landmark of contemporary architecture. It houses the Lower Austrian Parliament, as well as the government of Lower Austria.
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    •                         View of St. Poelten Landhaus and Klangturm / St. Poelten
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      Klangturm (Tower of Sound)

      Enjoy beautiful views of the city from the panoramic terrace of the Klangturm (total height 77 metres). The terrace can be reached either by a panoramic lift or by climbing 280 stairs.
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    Explore St. Pölten's Lifestyle

    Melk Abbey / Stift Melk
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    Melk Abbey

    The symbol of the Wachau Valley, just 20 minutes from St. Pölten, makes an easy day trip from the capital. The medieval Benedictine monastery with its steep, terraced vineyards overlooking the River Danube was founded in 1089. It is probably most famous for its library, with the main hall boasting an impressive 16,000 volumes and a ceiling fresco by Paul Troger. When visiting, it is easy to see why the Italian writer Umberto Eco drew inspiration from this site for his novel “The Name of the Rose” in which a monastic library plays a key role. The church itself features works from Baroque masters such as Antonio Beduzzi (interior design), Johann Michael Rottmayr and Paul Troger (frescos and altarpieces), and Guiseppe Galli-Bibiena (pulpit and high altar), and Lorenzo Mattielli and Peter Widerin (sculptures). Enjoy breathtaking panorama views from the semi-circular exterior terrace.

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